In the flesh appearing: Chicago, IL

A quick update for my faithful readers (all four of you): I will be traveling to Chicago, IL this week, where I am a plenary speaker at ITBE’s 38th annual convention. I’m looking forward to meeting and reconnecting with the utterly delightful ESL educators of Illinois, and am hopeful that this trip to Chicago features fewer emergency room visits than my last trip to Chicago did. If you happen to be attending ITBE, stop by the M-W booth and watch me attempt human interaction say hello!

Confidential to ITBE members who fall asleep during my talk on the history of the English language: we’ve all been there.

Blog posts will resume when I return next week.

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8 Comments

Filed under in the flesh appearing

8 responses to “In the flesh appearing: Chicago, IL

  1. Musicologyman

    Will this address be available on, say, YouTube? (Posting the text would fail to capture your response to the hecklers.)

  2. Larry Rubinow

    PRO TIP: You stand a better chance of keeping your audience engaged if you occasionally interrupt your talk with a saxophone solo.

  3. Good luck! Onnea! Soittakaa poliisi!

    I think you should spend most of your time arguing that in “ITBE” if “T” represents an acronym of five words (plus three left-out function words), “B” should certainly represent the two words of the B and the E: ITB. Then change your mind and start singing “Let ITBE.”

  4. Charming Charlie

    Only four regular readers? Pshaw, look how many replies follow mine!

  5. Six! Six regular readers. Bwahaha (trying to be the Count and failing miserably).

  6. Charming Charlie

    Well whatever, the average post has 28 comments.

    Hey, how do you determine which meaning will go first in a word’s definition? I was looking at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plurality and, to me, the third meaning is almost 3x more frequent than the first. Is that because I spend more time in the world of elections and less in…mathematics?

    If the meanings are ordered by frequency, that would imply that lexicographers have a representative sample of usage. How do you attempt to do that?

    If the meanings are ordered some other way, that will be revolutionary, as many word wars have been fought with the tactic “oh c’mon, that’s like the last listed meaning, you obviously used this word poorly.

    • korystamper

      Every publisher is different. At M-W and in the dictionaries we publish for native English speakers, we list definitions in historical order. I hope that’s good ammo for your own personal word wars.

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